Friday, 7 October 2022

It is Rod's and my great pleasure to welcome you all to Government House to celebrate the visit of His Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury to South Australia.

Adelaide is the second destination on the Archbishop’s busy Australian tour, and I trust, Your Grace, that you are enjoying your time with us.

As you said recently in your closing address to the Lambeth Conference, travelling, or “the obedience of going”, is one of the main ways in which the church finds renewal and revival.

The heart of the church is deeply relational, and travelling is how the church builds relationships.

I trust your visits to destinations across Australia will strengthen your connections with our people, and in particular our Anglican congregations.

This evening is a wonderful opportunity for the building of such connections, with leaders of the Anglican community present from education, parishes and church administration, as well as religious leaders from other faiths.

As I’m sure the South Australians in the room will be aware - and His Grace may be interested, given his commitment to interfaith dialogue - South Australia was founded in 1836 as a “paradise of dissent”, the first of its kind, where people could practise their faith freely.

At the time, this encompassed various Christian denominations.

Today, we are a proudly inclusive multicultural and multifaith society, and our legacy as a “city of churches” is evident on the streets of the CBD and North Adelaide.

The Anglican Church, of which I am a member, retains a vital role in the spiritual life of our state.

This year marks the 175th anniversary of the establishment of the Diocese of Adelaide, following the issuing of the letters patent and installation of Bishop Augustus Short as the Bishop of Adelaide.

It is fitting that the Archbishop is here with us to celebrate this important milestone in the life of the Diocese.

As an advocate for the advancement of women within the Anglican Church, Your Grace, you may be interested to know that our diocese has been a leader in this endeavour in Australia.

We were the first diocese in the country to appoint a female churchwarden, the first to appoint a female representative to General Synod, and the first to ordain women to the priesthood, among other accomplishments.

Friends,

The recent passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth has been felt deeply around the world, and in particular within the Anglican Communion.

The Archbishop’s assured hand during this time has been evident and appreciated.

Your Grace, in your sermon at the Queen’s funeral in Westminster Abbey, you commented on the outpouring of love for Her Majesty following her passing, and how this reflected her commitment to living a life of service to her people.

You said, “People of loving service are rare in any walk of life. Leaders of loving service are still rarer. But in all cases those who serve will be loved and remembered when those who cling to power and privileges are long forgotten.”

Thank you for prompting us to consider our approach to care and service as leaders, and how we may centre it even further in our lives.

Your Grace, thank you for your support of the Anglican Church in Australia, and for your dedicated advocacy for social justice, the environment, and all of creation.

I trust you and Mrs Welby will find your local activities, from formal dinners to time with Anglicare, and even visits to church community gardens, both fruitful and joyful.

Thank you for your inspirational leadership of the Anglican communion in South Australia, and around the world.

I once heard it said that faith is “hope with boots on the ground”, and your commitment to living out your faith illustrates this beautifully.

We wish you well as you continue God’s work in Australia and beyond.